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Eggs Increasingly in the Clear

February 17, 2016

The following is an archived post

 

A new study is yet another piece of evidence that eggs are making a comeback.

For a long time, it was recommended to limit egg consumption, as yolks are high in dietary cholesterol, which was thought to be associated with heart health risks, as high levels of cholesterol in the blood is associated with coronary disease.

 

But in recent years, researchers have found that consuming moderate amounts of dietary cholesterol is not linked to a significant rise in blood cholesterol. In fact, yolks are rich in a variety of nutrients beneficial to overall health and may even be heart-protective.

 

The new study out of Finland supports that a relatively high intake of dietary cholesterol (the equivalent of one egg per day) is not associated with elevated heart health risks.

 

While adult men were the subject of this study, a 2013 study suggested that eating more eggs eating is not associated with higher blood cholesterol in adolescents, regardless of how much physical activity they do.

 

There is also evidence that consuming cooked whole eggs with vegetables can increase vitamin absorption, namely carotenoids, the precursors to vitamin A.

 

In yet another study, researchers found that two raw egg yolks have almost twice as many antioxidant (antioxidants protect our cells) properties as an apple. But when cooked (fried or boiled), antioxidant properties were reduced by about half, and by a little more than half if the eggs were cooked in a microwave. This is a big reduction but still equal to apples in antioxidant value.

 

It’s important to be aware of WHAT we eat WITH our eggs. Often eggs are consumed with items high in saturated fats or other processed foods. An omelet with sausage and cheese, for example is far different that two eggs with salsa, whole wheat toast and fruit. For those that have diabetes and are at risk for heart disease, however, the 1973 American Heart Association recommendation of limiting egg intake to a maximum of three per week is likely still a good idea to err on the side of caution for ideal blood levels.

 

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